Crohn’s Disease: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment Options

Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can affect any part of the digestive tract. It usually causes intense and recurring abdominal pain, along with diarrhea, weight loss, fever, and vomiting. It can also lead to complications such as arthritis, ulcers, and even fistulas in more serious cases. Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can affect any part of the digestive tract. It usually causes intense and recurring abdominal pain, along with diarrhea, weight loss, fever, and vomiting.

The exact cause of Crohn’s disease remains unknown; however it is thought to be an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks its own healthy cells in response to an unknown stressor. There are multiple treatments available for people living with Crohn’s disease. These include medications to help ease symptoms like pain or diarrhea and surgery in some cases.

What are the Symptoms of Crohn’s Disease?

The symptoms of Crohn’s disease can vary from person to person, and can change over time. The most common symptoms include: Abdominal pain – This can range from mild discomfort to severe and debilitating cramps. Abdominal tenderness – People with Crohn’s disease may also experience abdominal pain or cramping when they have a bowel movement. Diarrhea – This can start off as loose stools, but can get worse and become watery or even bloody.

Other symptoms that may occur include: Fever and/or chills Weight loss or loss of appetite Fatigue Urgent need to have bowel movements Visible or protruding veins in the legs Ulcers in the mouth or around the anus Fistulas – These are abnormal connections between the intestine and other organs such as the bladder or the skin.

How is Crohn’s Disease Diagnosed?

A doctor can usually diagnose Crohn’s disease with a physical examination, a review of your medical history, and certain laboratory tests. After doing a physical exam, the doctor may order blood work or stool tests to rule out other conditions or diseases that could be causing symptoms.

Physical examination may reveal swelling and/or tenderness in the abdomen. It is also important to note that a doctor may not be able to make a diagnosis even after performing several tests.

This is especially true in the early stages of the disease when there are no obvious signs. In such cases, a doctor may diagnose you with “Crohn’s-like” disease, which means that your symptoms are consistent with Crohn’s, but the doctor cannot be certain. This diagnosis is often given when the disease is in an early stage and there are no obvious signs in the digestive tract.

Diet & Nutrition for People with Crohn’s Disease

The best way to manage symptoms is to keep nutrition intake consistent and balanced. For people with mild symptoms, this may be as simple as following standard dietary recommendations from their healthcare provider. Most people with mild symptoms can also benefit from following a Mediterranean-style diet. Such a diet consists of lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, seeds, and nuts.

It also includes fish, poultry, and beans, which are high in fibre, protein, and healthy fats. For people with more severe symptoms, a doctor may recommend a special diet that is low in fibre, sugar, and fat. Such diets can help control symptoms when they are severe. It is important to work with a healthcare provider to create a special diet plan that works for you.

Medications for Treating Crohn’s

Many medications are available to treat the symptoms of Crohn’s disease. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, your doctor may prescribe medication to help relieve pain and/or diarrhea, or to help control inflammation in your intestines. Pain medications – Over-the-counter pain medications like Advil or Tylenol can help ease mild abdominal pain. If more powerful pain medications are needed, a doctor may prescribe opioid medications, steroids, or anti-inflammatory drugs.

Diarrhea medications – Diarrhea can be treated with loperamide (Imodium), aminosalicylates (e.g., Dipentum, Salazoprofen), or antibiotics. Antidiarrheal medications like loperamide (Imodium) are not recommended because they can make diarrhea worse. Medications to control inflammation – As mentioned above, a diet low in fat and sugar can also help control inflammation in the intestines. In more serious cases, a doctor may prescribe immunosuppressants, biologic drugs, or steroids.

Bottom Line: Crohn's Disease Treatment

Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can affect any part of the digestive tract. It usually causes abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever, and vomiting. It can also lead to complications such as ulcers, arthritis, and even fistulas in more serious cases.

The exact cause of Crohn’s disease remains unknown, but it is thought to be an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks its own healthy cells in response to an unknown stressor. There are multiple treatments available for people living with Crohn’s disease. These include medications to help ease symptoms like pain or diarrhea and surgery in some cases.

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